The Student News Organization for Rutherford B. Hayes High School

The Talisman

The Student News Organization for Rutherford B. Hayes High School

The Talisman

The Student News Organization for Rutherford B. Hayes High School

The Talisman

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Reel connections: Unveiling the cinematic tapestry of Hayes Cinematics

Reel+connections%3A+Unveiling+the+cinematic+tapestry+of+Hayes+Cinematics
Izzy Kelly

From morning news broadcasts to short story tellers, Hayes Cinematics, an elective class offered at Hayes High School, stands out from the others.
Run by English teacher Tom Hering, interest in Hayes Cinematics spiked in the last year with their frequent showings at Delaware’s First Friday and in Hayes House events.
This group of students has been working to get movies out to Delaware residents by enhancing their filmmaking skills, as well as opening themselves up to more opportunities within the community.
The growth and change in the program is evident with the district’s increase in enrollment, resulting in the class filling up very quickly. There are 28 students currently in the class, which is only offered during fifth period.
“[Hayes Cinematics] once upon a time was a morning news class. We all had tv’s in all the rooms and they would do a live news broadcast,” Hering said. “When I took over 8 years ago, it had just transitioned into being short films, so when I took over we focused on those films.”
Students learn about the process of making films, while Hering said that he offers advice when asked, also allowing his students to explore and grow independently.
“I try to be involved with all steps throughout the process to help them grow,” Hering said.
The students themselves said that they take a more serious and professional stance in their own work while still having the benefits of a fun class.
“I would say the [the students’] biggest focus is making funny and scary films,” Hering said. “But, I would like to say when they have a project for an outside group, they do an amazing job at doing a professional, well organized and well researched product.”
With events like December’s First Friday showing, students involved go through a long process to create their films.
“First you just make characters, work on your script and work from there filming, editing and releasing,” said James Foster, a third-year Hayes Cinematics student. “[But] it doesn’t feel like a class, it doesn’t feel forced.”
The biggest change in the program this year is their switch to a quicker and more fast-paced release schedule due to their participation in a variety of events.
Despite the changes in this program, the experience of being in front of and behind the camera has not gone unappreciated by the students or the viewers.
The students frequently show their films at co-hatch and semi-regularly throughout the school year. Usually showing them in House, which has been popular amongst Hayes students.
“I have always been really into production, so it’s really cool to see the background of that,” said Elise Codwell, a first year Hayes Cinematics student. “But in the end, it’s a lot of fun and it turns out amazing.”

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About the Contributors
Josie Siegrist, Staff Writer
Josie Siegrist (she/her) is a junior at Hayes High School. This is her first year on staff. She plays guitar and listens to music in her free time. She loves music, reading, being surrounded by friends and family, creative writing and composing music.
@hayes_talisman
Izzy Kelly, Photographer
Izzy Kelly (she/her) is a junior at Hayes. This is her first year on staff. She enjoys exploring new music and being with friends. She is on the Hayes track team and works at Pet Palace.
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